New Harmonie Trustee's Report 2016-2017

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 2017

Principal address and registered office

12 Tennyson Close
Horsham
West Sussex RH12 5PN

Directors/Trustees

  • Mrs J S Richardson (Chairman)
  • Mrs D Campbell
  • Mr S R Dummer
  • Mrs S M Mullan
  • Mr P J Russell
  • Mrs J E Thomas
  • Dr P K Vella-Burrows

Officers and professional advisers

  • Secretary/Treasurer: Dr G A Richardson
  • Legal Adviser: Mrs K R Wright (solicitor, non-practising)
  • Music Adviser: Mrs S J Williams
  • Accountant: Mr J Attfield
  • Bankers: Lloyds TSB, 1 West Street, Horsham, West Sussex

The Trustees present their report for the year ended 31st March 2017. The report complies with The Charities (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008. It has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the company’s Memorandum and Articles of Association.

Objectives

New Harmonie is a registered charity (No. 1118410) and its Objects are:

(1) to further education in and appreciation, knowledge and enjoyment of music and related arts by the performance of public concerts especially in rural communities and by the encouragement of the composition of new musical works for inclusion in such performances;

(2) to relieve people who are elderly, sick or disabled by organising concerts, music workshops and similar activities in residential homes, nursing homes, hospitals, care homes and other institutions and places and by providing opportunities for such people to participate in those activities;

(3) to promote, maintain, improve and advance education and encourage participation in music, drama, music theatre, dance and related arts by organising concerts, workshops and other educational activities in schools and with groups of children and young people in the community;

(4) to carry out such other wholly charitable activities that are beneficial to the public and consistent with the objects above as the trustees shall in their absolute discretion determine from time to time.

Structure, governance and management

New Harmonie is constituted as a company limited by guarantee (registered in England and Wales No. 4142408). It was incorporated in 2001 and its Memorandum and Articles of Association set out how the organisation is structured and governed.

The charity is managed by a Board of Directors, all of whom are Trustees. The Board of Directors is responsible for determining New Harmonie’s policies and strategic direction. The Board delegates management of the day-to-day operations to the Secretary / Treasurer. The Secretary / Treasurer and the charity’s other professional advisers attend Board meetings but are not Directors.

New Directors are proposed with a view to ensuring a broad range of skills and experience on the Board. Names of individuals who might be willing to act as Directors are presented by the Chairman to the Board, which recommends them to the members for election. Directors must retire from office after serving four consecutive years, but they may stand for re-election.

Three of the current Directors are also the Members of the registered Company. No Member or Director has any interest in the charity’s contracts or any of its funds.

The Trustees are familiar with the guidance on public benefit issued by the Charity Commission and have regard to that guidance, where relevant, when planning the charity’s activities.

Financial Policies adopted by the Company

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the accounting policies set out in notes to the accounts and comply with the charity’s governing document, the Charities Act 2011 and Accounting and Reporting by Charities: Statement of Recommended Practice applicable to charities preparing their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard for Smaller Entities effective 1 January 2015.

The financial statements for the year ended 31st March 2017 record a net surplus of £960. The bulk of spending by New Harmonie is project based. Grants are obtained to fund a particular activity and then spending is ring-fenced within the budget for that project. Administration costs are about 10%.

During the 2016-17 financial year, New Harmonie made over 50 grant applications for several different projects. Of the fourteen grants awarded in 2016-17, one was for £9,900, one over £3,505, three for £2,000, six for £1,000, and three for £500 or less. £8,700 of unused grants were brought forward and £5,810 are carried forward to fund specific projects in the coming year.

These grants fund the mainstay of New Harmonie’s work and are tightly ring-fenced to cover the specific projects for which they have been awarded. Grants are often spent several months after they are awarded, once dates for venues and players have been confirmed. Spending of grants on particular projects may therefore cross two financial years.

The Directors agreed in 2005 to set aside a reserve fund of £5,000 to commission new works and arrangements if external grant funding could not be found. By 2015-16 this had reduced to £1,900 and the Board agreed to top it up with £3,000 from donations received, bringing it to £4,900, close to the original figure agreed by the Board. At the end of 2016-17 it remains at £4,900.

Achievements 2016-17

The key focus of New Harmonie’s work during 2016-17 continued to be the use of live music as a care intervention in dementia and palliative care. Careful evaluation of all these sessions by staff, players, family members/carers and, where possible, patients generates valuable quantitative and qualitative anonymous data. New Harmonie has used this data extensively to provide feedback to funders, to develop New Harmonie’s work in the future and, in one case, to write and publish a joint paper in partnership with hospital staff to disseminate findings to other health care and performing art groups. The evaluations show the impact of regular, live music sessions as a powerful intervention tool with severely distressed dementia patients and those receiving palliative care, and demonstrate a positive impact on well-being, with minimal ill-being effects.

Activities 2016-17

This section details some of the specific activities carried out by New Harmonie by reference to its four objects. In planning activities for the year, the Trustees have paid regard to the Charity Commission’s guidance on public benefit, where relevant to those activities.

1.to further education in and appreciation, knowledge and enjoyment of music and related arts by the performance of public concerts especially in rural communities and by the encouragement of the composition of new musical works for inclusion in such performances;

Funding for public concerts has proved much more difficult to find. Touring has not taken place this year to village halls/churches. The focus of New Harmonie’s work is now on using live music as an intervention with dementia and palliative care.

2. to relieve people who are elderly, sick or disabled by organising concerts, music workshops and similar activities in residential homes, nursing homes, hospitals, care homes and other institutions and places and by providing opportunities for such people to participate in those activities;

This year, New Harmonie was awarded grants by the Big Lottery Fund, Sussex Community Foundation, The Dorothy Betty Simpson Charitable Trust, The Garfield Weston Foundation, The Charlotte Bonham-Carter Charitable Trust, Gatwick Airport Community Trust, The Gurney Charitable Trust, The William Allen Young Charitable Trust, The Albert Hunt Trust, The Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust, H A Holiday Charitable Trust, The J P Jacobs Charitable Trust, Care UK Wellbeing Foundation and Lionel Wigram Memorial Trust.

A quintet of players (flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn) ran 24 sessions for adults with a dementia and 12 for adults in a hospice day centre. Sessions for elderly patients with a dementia were held at:

Glen Vue, East Grinstead: April 6, 13, 20; September 12, 19, 26; November 28

Mill Vue, East Grinstead: May 9, 23; June 13; July 10; December 5, 12; March 20, 27

Haviland House, Worthing: October 3, 10, 17, 24; December 19

Maidenbower, Crawley: December 21; January 30; February 6, 13

Sessions for palliative care were held at:

St Peter and St James Hospice, Chailey: May 13, 20, 27; September 9, 16, 23;

February 3, 10, 17, 24; March 3, 10

3. to promote, maintain, improve and advance education and encourage participation in music, drama, music theatre, dance and related arts by organising concerts, workshops and other educational activities in schools and with groups of children and young people in the community;

We were unable to obtain funds for this work in 2016-17.

4 to carry out such other wholly charitable activities that are beneficial to the public and consistent with the objects above as the trustees shall in their absolute discretion determine from time to time.

New Harmonie is always looking for new ways of using music to benefit people in the community. Contacts with Carers Support West Sussex and two West Sussex Community Hospitals are being followed and two additional dementia centres have asked New Harmonie to be involved. provided we can obtain funding.

Evaluation

A very important part of New Harmonie’s approach is to evaluate every session with patients (where possible), family members/carers, staff and players. Questionnaires are used to assess the impact of live music on mood and well-being. The data (both quantitative and qualitative) are anonymous and included in the final report to funders. Below are a few comments given as part of our evaluation process, including from family carers present in workshops who know their family member with dementia very well.

Patients (Mill View)

I come to hear the music specially.” “Discovered my voice has dropped from tenor to baritone.” “I absolutely loved the music. Can’t imagine a world without music. It always cheers me up.” “I really enjoyed this morning, the music helped me to relax.” “I did enjoy myself and I hope I have enough voice for next week.” “Oh I shall be here again for your lovely music.” “It is so nice to hear you again. I love it. We both love ‘We’ll meet again’ - after 40 happy years with our partners who died – we married – it is our 21st anniversary.”

Carers/Volunteers (Maidenbower)

It is lovely that you came.” “Even the very disabled attendees were responding from the first moment. They clearly really enjoyed the session.” “Stimulating thank you.” “They normally have a snooze at this time – kept her awake, humming, singing along and dancing.” “He responded more than I ever seen him respond before.”

Staff member Activities Organiser (Glen Vue) “Many thanks for three brilliant days. Some of the customers still enjoying talking about their enjoyment from last Monday. The music and interactions had a lasting effect for the rest of the day with many of the customers and a few over the rest of the week, music truly is an amazing key…. The new songs went down well with our customers and they certainly enjoyed joining in with the instruments and opportunities to dance. Our married couple who spontaneously got up to dance with a big smile on their faces and shared in reminiscing about dancing in their youth. Our customer GA has already said he can’t wait for your return in June, as your team had a good rapport with him. Our Customer AV who we generally have difficulties gaining much interaction or response with of late, even managed to move her hand enough to make noise with a tambourine, which was great for us to see as a team as we strive to gain as much interaction between her and ourselves and other customers as possible. Big thanks from CC for playing him HAPPY BIRTHDAY I know he really enjoyed it.”.

Day Care Manager Wellbeing Centre (St Peter and St James Hospice) “New Harmonie have been an absolute delight to host at the well being centre. The patients all said that they loved the music, particularly as they can join in by clapping, shaking bean jars, moving their limbs and/or singing along. This suits people of all abilities – the most vocal of all the patients uses only his voice to express himself and one patient can only use hands to join in. However, for the more mobile, there is plenty of subtle exercise built into the performance. For example, the hokey-cokey has been adapted for chair based routines. There is a huge variety of music that is played to suit the majority of tastes and patients are encouraged to make requests for following sessions, which always goes down well. The patients all seem very interested to learn about how the music has been put together and details about each instrument. Patients that are more familiar with the instruments have been encouraged to talk about their experience. What feels very nice for the patients is where the group doesn’t rush off after their session but stay around to talk to people individually, gathering their views but also allowing the patients to talk about things that have come up through the session. The group seem genuinely interested in entertaining the patients, discussing the broader aspects of the music and ensuring that they can contribute to the session if they so wish. There are always a lot of jokes, smiles and laughs when New Harmonie are with us and this is just as important to all of us as the music itself.”

NEW HARMONIE PLAYERS

The following musicians were involved in grant funded workshops during 2016-17:

Flute: Anne Hodgson, Elizabeth Burtenshaw

Oboe: Sarah Williams, Clare Thornton-Wood

Clarinet: Geoffrey Richardson

Bassoon: Sue Bellamy, Angela Kirsten

Horn: Annie Barnard, Stephen Caldicott, Emma Laurens

Composer/Arranger: Dr Liz Lane

The following additional players also played in New Harmonie’s informal rehearsal groups (trio, quintet) during the year. Clarinet: Bridget Wilcox; Bassoon: Jenny Gill; Horn: Richard Gamlen.

Mrs Jill S Richardson

Chairman Date

Dr Geoffrey Richardson

Secretary/Treasurer Date